There is only one grammatical form for statements in the language:

bundle bundle_type name
{
promise_type:

  classes::

    "promiser" -> { "promisee1", "promisee2", ... }

        attribute_1 => value_1,
        attribute_2 => value_2,
        ...
        attribute_n => value_n;
}

In addition, CFEngine bodies can be defined and used as attribute values. Here's a real-life example of a body and its usage.

body edit_defaults no_backup
{
      edit_backup => "false";
}

... and elsewhere, noting the attribute name matches the body type ...

  files:
    "myfile" edit_defaults => no_backup;

You can recognize everything in CFEngine from just those few concepts.

A declaration about the state we desire to maintain (e.g., the permissions or contents of a file, the availability or absence of a service, the (de)installation of a package).

A collection of promises.

A part of a promise which details and constrains its nature, possibly in separate and re-usable parts. Effectively a body is like a promise attribute that has several parameters.

CFEngine's boolean classifiers that describe context.

An association of the form "LVALUE represents RVALUE", where RVALUE may be a scalar value or a list of scalar values: a string, integer or real number.

This documentation about the language concepts introduces in addition

Syntax, identifiers and names

The CFEngine 3 language has a few simple rules:

  • CFEngine built-in words, names of variables, bundles, body templates and classes may only contain the usual alphanumeric and underscore characters (a-zA-Z0-9_)
  • All other 'literal' data must be quoted.
  • Declarations of promise bundles in the form:

    bundle agent-type identifier
    {
    ...
    }
    

    where agent-type is the CFEngine component responsible for maintaining the promise.

  • Declarations of promise body-parts in the form:

    body constraint_type template_identifier
    {
    ...
    }
    

    matching and expanding on a reference inside a promise of the form constraint_type => template_identifier

  • attribute expressions in the body of a promise take the form

    left-hand-side (CFEngine_word) => right-hand-side (user defined data).
    

    This can take several forms:

    cfengine_word => user_defined_template(parameters)
                  user_defined_template
                  builtin_function()
                  "quoted literal scalar"
                  { list }
    

    In each of these cases, the right hand side is a user choice.

    CFEngine uses many `constraint expressions' as part of the body of a promise. These take the form: left-hand-side (CFEngine word) '=>' right-hand-side (user defined data). This can take several forms:

    cfengine_word => user_defined_template(parameters)
        user_defined_template
        builtin_function()
        "quoted literal scalar"
        { list }
    

    In each of these cases, the right hand side is a user choice.

Filenames and Paths

Filenames in Unix-like operating systems use the forward slash '/' character for their directory separator. All references to file locations must be absolute pathnames in CFEngine, i.e. they must begin with a complete specification of which directory they are in or with a variable reference that resolves to that. For example:

/etc/passwd
/var/cfengine/masterfiles/distfile
$(sys.masterdir)/distfile # usually the same thing in 3.6

The only place where it makes sense to refer to a file without a complete directory specification is when searching through directories for different kinds of file, e.g. in pattern matching

leaf_name => { "tmp_.*", "output_file", "core" };

Here, one can write core without a path, because one is looking for any file of that name in a number of directories.

The Windows operating systems traditionally use a different filename convention. The following are all valid absolute file names under Windows:

c:\winnt
"c:\spaced name"
c:/winnt
/var/cfengine/inputs
//fileserver/share2/dir

The 'drive' name "C:" in Windows refers to a partition or device. Unlike Unix, Windows does not integrate these seamlessly into a single file-tree. This is not a valid absolute filename:

\var\cfengine\inputs

Paths beginning with a backslash are assumed to be win32 paths. They must begin with a drive letter or double-slash server name.

Note that in many cases, you have sys.inputdir and other Special Variables that work equally well on Windows and non-Windows system.

Note in recent versions of Cygwin you can decide to use the /cygdrive to specify a path to windows file E.g /cygdrive/c/myfile means c:\myfile or you can do it straight away in CFEngine as c:\myfile.